Does It Really Do That? Paw Perfect

Does It Really Do That? Paw Perfect

PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — It’s not something many of us like to do: Trimming your dog’s claws. And many times the dogs don’t like it either.


But the makers of “Paw Perfect” claim they’ve created a device that can make it much easier.


In a TV commercial, the announcer says: “But Debbie’s dog doesn’t mind it at all because she’s found a simple pain free solution. Introducing Paw Perfect.”


But we wondered, “Does It Really Do That?”


We enlisted the help of Laura Welsh, from McDonald, and a cute little dog named Charlie.


Paw Perfect is a battered-powered nail file with two speeds, and it has a safety guard with three holes for different sized breeds.


It also has a light, but we found a problem with it. The light only works for the biggest sized hole, and doesn’t line up with the smaller ones.


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Laura also questioned which direction you should insert your pet’s claws, because the instructions show two different ways.


The instructions also say to turn the device on and off a few times near your pet and maybe give them a treat, so they get used to it. So we do that with Charlie.


Once he seems more comfortable, Laura begins filing Charlie’s nails, but Charlie pulls his paw back on the first attempt.


He then squirms away. But she’s able to coax him back for another try and eventually, it seems to be working.


Just as the instructions said, “It only takes two to four seconds on each nail.”


Laura says: “Now, that he’s used to it. It is working.”


Paw Perfect costs $19.99 and comes with fine rollers and an extra fine roller. You can also order replacement rollers.


The instructions say to be assertive with your pet but also patients.


Once both Laura and Charlie got used to it, it worked well enough that Laura says she would try it instead of trimming with the traditional clippers.


“I think I would give this a try because sometimes when you’re using the clippers. You’re hearing that crunching and thinking, ‘How close am I?'” she said.